WHY YOU DON’T NEED A F**KING THIGH GAP

WHY YOU DON’T NEED A F**KING THIGH GAP


Today we are talking about the thigh grap craze, which is currently sweeping social media faster than a cleaner on two scoops of pre workout.

Check out this heartbreaking email from Rebecca:

(Shared with persmission, of course.)

“Hey Russ, I have a question…

All of my friends have a thigh gap and I don’t. Every time we post a picture they always make jokes about my thicker legs, and they get more likes than me every time. I’m not really overweight for my height (size 8), but this makes me feel really inadequate.

Are there any specific exercises I can do to address this? A trainer at my local gym has given me a few but none have worked so far.”

Holy s**t.

Social media is a lot like Ancient Egypt (writing on walls, woshipping cats, etc.), but it’s also one of the biggest breeding grounds for mental health issues.

Seriously.

A 2018 study pubslished in BMJ Open linked increased social media usage to poor sleep, anxiety, and even depression. Given the constant lifestyle comparisons, the dopamine hit of acceptance (or rejection) by your peers, and the fear of missing out on the latest trends, it can really consume us if we let it. (1)

Which brings me back to the so-called thigh gap craze.

Sometimes social media throws us trends which are downright dangerous and this is one of them. We’ll get into the nitty gritty of why you do NOT need a thigh gap below, but with regards to the specific exercises you’re asking for, I actually have a move I’d like you to pass on to your “friends”.

Please instruct them to walk to the nearest mirror, raise their arm, and give themselves a big f**king thumbs down.



how to get a thigh gap

TRAINING FOR A THIGH GAP?

A so-called “thigh gap” is the result of two things:

  • Hip bone placement
  • Malnutrition

You can’t train either of those things, but that won’t stop p**-poor trainers like this trying to cash in on the trend. Believe it or not, that particular article claims you can achieve a thigh gap by following a low carb diet and avoiding squats (!!).

This is despite the fact that we have DECADES of research confirming that spot reduction (specifically targeting one area of the body for fat loss) is impossible and, likewise, confirming that there is zero difference in fat loss between high carb and low carb diets. (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

The same article claimed that you should lift with resistance bands instead of dumbbells, because weights will “bulk you out”. I cannot shake my head enough.

It is a trainer’s responsibility to protect the public from bulls**t information regarding health and fitness, but sadly we live in a world where bulls**t is active currency.

can you train to get a thigh gap

There are hundreds of articles like that one out there, resulting in lots of women unnecessarily thinking there is something wrong with their body when the silly advice doesn’t work.

Worse still, there are very real dangers to heaping such unbelievable pressure on young women. Females have had to deal with unrealistic expectaions for years, but now they’re supposed to…. change the shape of their bodies in physically impossible ways?

Give me a f**king break. That’s how eating disorders start.

So NO, you do not need a thigh gap, and I want you to stop worrying about getting one.

Improving your body should be about becoming the fittest, healthiest version of yourself – not being bogged down by a bunch of bullying, weak-willed motherf**kers who do not deserve your attention. Done.



References:

  1. Scott H., et al. Social media use and adolescent sleep patterns: cross-sectional findings from the UK millennium cohort study. BMJ Open (2019).
  2. Katch F., et al. Effects of Sit Up Exercise Training On Adipose Cell Size and Adiposity. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (1984).
  3. Leibel R.L., et al. Energy intake required to maintain body weight is not affected by wide variation in diet composition. Am J Clin Nutr (1992).
  4. Golay A., et al. Similar weight loss with low- or high-carbohydrate diets. Am J Clin Nutr (1996).
  5. Golay A., et al. Weight-loss with low or high carbohydrate diet. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord (1996).
  6. Luscombe-Marsh N. D., et al. Carbohydrate-restricted diets high in either monounsaturated fat or protein are equally effective at promoting fat loss and improving blood lipids. Am J Clin Nutr (2005).
  7. Raatz S. K., et al. Reduced Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Diets Do Not Increase the Effects of Energy Restriction on Weight Loss and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Men and Women. J Nut (2005).
  8. Johnston C. S., et al. Ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets have no metabolic advantage over nonketogenic low-carbohydrate diets. Am J Clin Nutr (2006).

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